Assam’s Nepalis support the Gorkhaland movement – but say they will never leave their state

As a student at the Indian Institute of Technology in Dhanbad Jharkhand, Krishna Khatiwoda endeavored to explain to people that although he was from Nepal by descent, Assam was his home state. “I had an identity crisis,” said Khatiwoda, who speaks fluently assamois and graduated from high school this year. “When I told people I am from Nepal, they are going to say: ‘Oh, you are Nepal’ But I would tell them ‘I am not … I am Assam I am Indian ..’

While Darjeeling, West Bengal, blinded new demands for the creation of a separate state of Gorkhaland of Nepalese origin from Gorkha, like Khatiwoda – Nepal who was born and raised in Assam – supported the state movement. “This is a struggle for our identity,” Khatiwoda said. “We need a separate statement, so we do not have to explain every time we introduce ourselves that we are not in Nepal, but we are Indians.”

According to the 2001 census, Assam is home to 5.65 lakh Nepalese-speaking people – the highest of any state after West Bengal (which had 10.23 Nepali lakh in 2001). However, Nepalese in Assam said the actual number was even higher. “Assam has the largest number of Nepal in the country,” said Sanjib Chetri, secretary of the All Gorkha Assam Student Union. “There are about 25 Nepali lakhs in Assam. In Bengal, the number will not exceed 20 lakh.”

Rajsekhar Sapota, a veterinary science student in Guwahati, said that “the house always Assam” supported the claim of a separate state of Gorkhaland because it was simply that the Nepal community responded to its fair value. “If you go to the area around Darjeeling, you will see that the population is completely different from the rest of [West Bengal],” he said.

In 1986, when the demand for a separate state of Gorkhaland was first acquired in 1986, after the widespread expulsion of Nepal Meghalaya under the Gorkha National Liberation Front, led by Subhash Ghising. At that time, the Joint Action Committee of the New Optical Assam Organizations, Nepal’s dominant group organization in Assam, had set the Nepal number in Assam at about 18 lakh.

Nepali people speaking in Assam came in waves. The first large-scale migration was believed to have occurred in 1826 when the British were using Gorkha soldiers to annex Assam. Later, the British also brought a large number of Nepal to work in the state as many workers in the coal mines and oil fields in the region. The large tracts of green land of Assam also attracted the shepherds of Nepal in recent years.

While people of Nepalese origin are largely friendly with other Asamois, there have been cases of parasitic power, especially in the years following the Assam agreement in 1985. Among other things. The document sets midnight on March 24, 1971, as the date for entry into the state. All those who came to the state of Assam after they would declare themselves illegal immigrants. Although the movement was aimed at preventing illegal immigrants from Bangladesh to the Bay, Nepal has also been caught in the crossfire on occasion.